Dune (Series of 6 books)

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C_D
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Dune (Series of 6 books)

Post by C_D » Tue Sep 26, 2017 12:11 pm

I saw the film back in the 80's and unfortunately it didn't do much for me. I mean, Sting was in it, for gods sake. David Lynch is better at directing his own ideas on film - his intepretation of Dune was not my cup of tea. I mainly read sci-fi, so this detered me from reading the book, but having been alerted to it by member Bene Gesserit, I loaded it up to Kindle and by golly, it's extremely good.

The Dune series of books is quite literally littered with eminently quotable material. The story, to my mind, deals predominantly with issues of a human nature - how power corrupts, the machinations of the elite, how good intentions can turn out bad, religious fervour, to name a few - and particularly, my favourite field of study - matters of mind.

There's so much in there, particularly the little prefaces before each chapter. Herbert was a great observer of human nature. It's surprisingly fresh - and I guess, will ultimately prove timeless - considering it was written back in the 1960's.

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Re: Dune (Series of 6 books)

Post by C_D » Tue Sep 26, 2017 12:34 pm

There exists no separation between gods and men; one blends softly casual into the other.
Herbert, Frank. Dune Messiah: The Second Dune Novel (The Dune Sequence) (p. 11). Orion. Kindle Edition.

Every civilization must contend with an unconscious force which can block, betray or countermand almost any conscious intention of the collectivity.
Herbert, Frank. Dune Messiah: The Second Dune Novel (The Dune Sequence) (p. 31). Orion. Kindle Edition.

Empires do not suffer emptiness of purpose at the time of their creation. It is when they have become established that aims are lost and replaced by vague ritual.
Herbert, Frank. Dune Messiah: The Second Dune Novel (The Dune Sequence) (p. 67). Orion. Kindle Edition.

Truth suffers from too much analysis.
Herbert, Frank. Dune Messiah: The Second Dune Novel (The Dune Sequence) (p. 99). Orion. Kindle Edition.

Here lies a toppled god- His fall was not a small one. We did but build his pedestal, A narrow and a tall one.
Herbert, Frank. Dune Messiah: The Second Dune Novel (The Dune Sequence) (p. 141). Orion. Kindle Edition.

No matter how exotic human civilization becomes, no matter the developments of life and society nor the complexity of the machine/human interface, there always come interludes of lonely power when the course of humankind, the very future of humankind, depends upon the relatively simple actions of single individuals.
Herbert, Frank. Dune Messiah: The Second Dune Novel (The Dune Sequence) (p. 209). Orion. Kindle Edition.

The convoluted wording of legalisms grew up around the necessity to hide from ourselves the violence we intend toward each other. Between depriving a man of one hour from his life and depriving him of his life there exists only a difference of degree. You have done violence to him, consumed his energy. Elaborate euphemisms may conceal your intent to kill, but behind any use of power over another the ultimate assumption remains: “I feed on your energy.”
Herbert, Frank. Dune Messiah: The Second Dune Novel (The Dune Sequence) (p. 237). Orion. Kindle Edition.


The above are taken from the second Dune novel and are a few of the 'headline prefaces' for each chapter throughout each book.
And by the sixth book in the series, we've moved on to stuff like this:


Those who would repeat the past must control the teaching of history.
Herbert, Frank. Chapter House Dune: The Sixth Dune Novel (The Dune Sequence) (p. 1). Orion. Kindle Edition.

...I know a profound pattern humans deny with words even while their actions affirm it. They say they seek security and quiet, conditions they call peace. Even as they speak, they create seeds of turmoil and violence.
Herbert, Frank. Chapter House Dune: The Sixth Dune Novel (The Dune Sequence) (p. 9). Orion. Kindle Edition.

The person who takes the banal and ordinary and illuminates it in a new way can terrify. We do not want our ideas changed. We feel threatened by such demands. “I already know the important things!” we say. Then Changer comes and throws our old ideas away.
Herbert, Frank. Chapter House Dune: The Sixth Dune Novel (The Dune Sequence) (p. 12). Orion. Kindle Edition.

Rules build up fortifications behind which small minds create satrapies. A perilous state of affairs in the best of times, disastrous during crises.
Herbert, Frank. Chapter House Dune: The Sixth Dune Novel (The Dune Sequence) (p. 20). Orion. Kindle Edition.

We tend to become like the worst in those we oppose.
Herbert, Frank. Chapter House Dune: The Sixth Dune Novel (The Dune Sequence) (p. 23). Orion. Kindle Edition.

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