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jakell
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Gotcha

Post by jakell » Mon Oct 09, 2017 11:24 am

Jordan Peterson announced some time back a project where he would examine and list University courses in regard to their Marxist and postmodernist content so that potential students would be able to make more informed choices.

Here though, we have offical recognition that students feel (increasingly?) inclined to avoid this sort of thing without any external help, and the response seems to be a course that is designed to 'trick' students into wading into social justice issues by pretending to be about something else. It's seems odd that those running the course have let the cat out of the bag like this, so it's either ego/arrogance that caused them to reveal their cunning plan, or they were pretty circumspect but were uncovered by some meddling kids (are Scooby Doo references still useful in this day and age?).

It seems to me though that this sort of thing has been going on for a while, just never this blatant. Sargon lays the details out in the first part of this video:


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jakell
Posts: 187
Joined: Sat Aug 05, 2017 11:10 am

Re: Gotcha

Post by jakell » Thu Oct 26, 2017 10:16 am

This professor feels that some students don't feel oppressed enough. Of course, the fault is deemed to lie with the students and they need instruction and the problem is not so much how to lead them to water, but how to get them to drink (Kool Aid references may be employed in addition). The above method would be one route, possibly with the enticement of some Lego thrown in.

.....A University of Connecticut professor is calling for a “more expansive inclusion of feminism” by colleges to help female students recognize the oppression they face.

Cristina Mogro-Wilson, who teaches social work at UConn, surveyed 118 students pursuing a Masters in Social Work (MSW) degree and found that the overwhelming majority of respondents—94 percent of whom were women—do not believe that “discrimination and subordination” are “salient issues in women’s lives.”

While the respondents were less likely to believe that discrimination was a major issue in their lives than were MSW students surveyed for a 2013 national sample, many of them still agreed with other feminist topics of concern, such as the need for “liberal gender roles” and “equality, equal opportunities, and respect.”

The findings are problematic, Mogro-Wilson contends, because without a sense of their own oppression, students may be disinclined to “embrace the notion of change through unification,” such as in the form of protesting.

Worrying about the potential of a “post-feminist standpoint among younger women who no longer see discrimination against women as being a salient issue,” Mogro-Wilson calls for incorporating more intersectionality into the social work curriculum.

“Intersectionality provides a useful framework to examine gender-based oppression,” she says, adding that discrimination “cannot be fully understood without also considering other coexisting social identities, like race, culture, sexuality, and class.”

She also deems it “essential that students learn to nuance their understandings around oppression, so that when considering foundational social work issues, like poverty, mental health status, and oppression, that to the extent possible all areas of social identity are explored in combination.”

Without a strong understanding of how women are discriminated against, Mogro-Wilson worries that her social work students might be doing their future clients a disservice, noting that research has shown that “social workers tend to perpetuate traditional gender roles.”

To that end, she contends that social work programs must make a concerted effort to help female students realize not only how they face oppression personally, but how other women face oppression as well.
“This study indicates that there may be reason for a more expansive inclusion of feminism in social work education,” she concludes, adding that doing so could promote “the role of collective action in gaining gender equality.”
Campus Reform reached out to Mogro-Wilson for comment, but did not receive a response.
http://archive.is/0IsRq#selection-785.0-935.73

I should credit The Britisher for unearthing these, I haven't posted the relevant video this time as some folks like to read.

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